Friday, June 12, 2009

Sleep Apnea and a deviated Septum

A deviated septum can be a factor in developing sleep apnea. The septum is the area between the nostrils that separate the nasal passages. Any blockage can cause disruption of your breathing.

What causes a deviated septum?
You could be born with a deviated septum or you could have one as a result of an injury to the nose. Old age can also be a factor causing the septum to be crooked.

What is done to treat a deviated septum?
The surgery is usually done as an outpatient basis. The entire procedure takes between 60 and 90 minutes. Working through the nose, the surgeon bends the cartilage to eliminate the blockage.

After the surgery there may be packing inside the nose, it will stay there for up to 3 days allowing the nose to heal.

Unfortunately just having the surgery doesn’t correct sleep apnea for those who have severe OSA.

One ENT that I saw suggested that I have the surgery. He told me that although it wouldn’t cure my sleep apnea it would certainly help. I declined and I’m glad I did. Because I went to another ENT and he said that I didn’t need the surgery at all. So it is always good to have a second opinion.

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9 comments:

  1. If you are suffering from sleep problems such as insomnia or obstructive sleep apnea, you need to consider this problem seriously and adopt specific measures at the earliest to get back your sleep. Regular exercising is one of the options to ensure sound sleep at night. Altogether, if you are unable to get adequate sleep during night, you can undertake certain initiatives to overcome your sleep problems such as fixing your sleeping as well as waking schedule and abstaining from alcohol, nicotine, tea, coffee et al before hitting the bed.

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  2. Thanks for the comment, Dr. zim! great advice

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  3. David,
    I went ahead w/ the nose surgery since it was such a minor procedure and the risks were low. Did not do the USPPP or tonsel removal since these are very invasive and the doctors could offer no good reason why it would work. My apnea went from severe to mild. Also, don't agree w/ the conclusion that its good to have a second opinion for the reason that the second doctor told you what you wanted to hear. Have found that most specialists are double booked for ten minute appointments (!!!) and give unstable assessments and can't remember anything they told you in previous visits and its easy to find what you want to hear if you don't do a good job reminding them of your history.

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  4. Hi Jeff,
    In my case I was glad that I went ahead with a second opinion because it saved me from having a surgery that I didn't need.
    thanks for comments
    David

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  5. All,

    I had the surgery and it cured my apnea and snoring. I was diagnosed with severe sleep apnea and my cpap was set to twelve. Two months after the surgery I had a sleep study done and no episodes at all. I've been off the cpap for two months and feel like an 18 year old:) The surgery was not bad, a little drip and soreness for a couple of weeks. That's it.

    Mark

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    Replies
    1. Wow, I am so glad to hear this! I was just told to have septoplasty for my sleep apnea. If this helps, I will be SO glad.....

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  6. Hi Mark,
    Thanks for the feedback. I am glad that the procedure worked for you.
    David

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  7. I had the nasal surgery and was great for a about 2 yrs ,now its blocked again and my snoring is really bad. Im considering the pillar implants,my wife cant sleep. Dave

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  8. that's bad that after 2 years you are blocked up again, let us know if you decide on the pillar implants
    thanks
    David

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